According to Wikipedia, SAT is a standardized test widely used for college admissions in the United States which was first introduced in 1926 and its name and scoring have changed several times.

SAT was originally called the Scholastic Aptitude Test, then the Scholastic Assessment Test, then the SAT I: Reasoning Test, then the SAT Reasoning Test, and now simply the SAT.

SAT is owned and published by the College Board which is a private, nonprofit organization in the United States. It is developed and administered on behalf of the College Board by the Educational Testing Service. The test is intended to assess a student’s readiness for college. It is designed to not be aligned to high school curriculum.

How To Prepare For And Take SAT In Nigeria To Study Abroad

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Is SAT valid only for US universities?

The standardized test – SAT – is a mandatory criteria for a Bachelors degree in US. However, though not obligatory, some universities in other locations like Singapore, UK, Canada, Finland, Australia and so on also accept scores on the same for a Bachelors degree level.

Structure of SAT

The current SAT takes 3 hours to finish plus 50 minutes for the SAT with essay. Possible scores on the SAT range from 400 to 1600, combining test results from two 800-point sections: Mathematics and Critical reading and Writing.

The SAT is scored on a 400 to 1600 scale. You will also receive subscore reporting for every test—math, reading, and writing and language—plus additional subscores to provide added insight into your test performance.

SAT consists of three major sections:

  • Critical Reading,
  • Mathematics, and
  • Writing.

Each section receives a score on the scale of 200–800. All scores are multiples of 10. Total scores are calculated by adding up scores of the three sections.

Each major section is divided into three parts. There are 10 sub-sections, including an additional 25-minute experimental or “equating” section that may be in any of the three major sections.

The experimental section is used to normalize questions for future administrations of the SAT and does not count toward the final score.

The test contains 3 hours and 45 minutes of actual timed sections; most administrations (after accounting for orientation, distribution of materials, completion of biographical sections, and fifteen minutes of timed breaks) run for about four and a half hours.

The questions range from easy, medium, and hard depending on the scoring from the experimental sections. Easier questions typically appear closer to the beginning of the section while harder questions are toward the end in certain sections.

This is not true for every section (the Critical Reading section is in chronological order) but it is the rule of thumb mainly for math, grammar, and the 19 sentence-completions in the reading sections.

About the Reading Test

When you take the Reading Test, you’ll read passages and interpret informational graphics. Then you’ll use what you’ve read to answer questions.

Some questions ask you to locate a piece of information or an idea stated directly. But you’ll also need to understand what the author’s words imply. In other words, you have to read between the lines.

Find out more about the Critical Reading Test on the College Board SAT page

About the Writing and Language Test

To answer some questions, you’ll need to look closely at a single sentence. Others require reading the entire piece and interpreting a graphic. For instance, you might be asked to choose a sentence that corrects a misinterpretation of a scientific chart or that better explains the importance of the data.

The passages you improve will range from arguments to nonfiction narratives and will be about careers, history, social studies, the humanities, and science.

Find out more about the Critical Reading Test on the College Board SAT page